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Unless you live under a rock that has no Internet connectivity, you know of Ed Snowden. You might also be aware of his predecessor in NSA whistle-blowing, Thomas Drake. But it’s likely you haven’t heard of Perry Fellwock (once known by the nom de plume "Winslow Peck"). But Fellwock, the semi-retired antiques dealer, was the NSA’s first whistle-blower, revealing in an essay for now-shuttered radical magazine "Ramparts" the shadowy and barely heard of surveillance activities of the spy agency 30 years ago.In a stunning profile published on Gawker Tuesday, Adrian Chen meets the skittish former NSA analyst and recounts his fascinating story, which traces too the shifts and expansions of NSA operations, and the growing war on whistle-blowers in recent decades. Chen notes:Fellwock became the NSA’s first whistleblower, going to the press to explain the spy agency’s immense scope and mission to a public that had barely been allowed to know such an organization existed. His revelations in the radical magazine Ramparts were picked up by the front page of the New York Times. He went on to be a key player in the turbulent anti-surveillance movement of the 1970s, partnering with Norman Mailer and becoming the target of CIA propaganda.Continue Reading…

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